Author: Methi Laithavewat

We are very happy to announce that the city of Trondheim has finished its Bold City Vision!

We are very happy to announce that the city of Trondheim has finished its Bold City Vision!  

Led by Astrid Haugslett and Kelly Riedesel, Vision for Sustainable Urban Transition – Bold City Vision – is Trondheim’s guide to becoming an energy positive city by 2050. The team also included Silja Rønningsen, Bjørn Ove Berthelsen, Tom Jensen, Leendert Wienhofen, Dirk Ahlers, Marit T. Myrstad, Jens, Vida, Cole Grabinsky, Klaus Livik, Kristian Mjøen Morten Wolden Courtney Killion, Annemie Wyckmans Kristian Dahlberg Hauge Øyvind S. Tanum Samah Elsaadi, Agata Krause, Henriette Louise Krogness and many more.

In order to create an energy positive city, there are many aspects that need to be considered. The vision is energy specific, but strongly connected to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This elevates the work by involving other sectors relevant for the multi-level, multi-disciplinary and multi-angle sustainable transformation.

Linking the SDGs to the Norwegian context, the BCV is a framework for Sustainable Societal Development. As a result of Trondheim’s role as a Lighthouse city and commitment to Sustainable Value Creation (SVC), Trondheim Municipality received 3rd place as Rising Innovative City in the 2021 European Capital of Innovation Awards. SCV is comprised of four pillars; potential, readiness, opportunity, and impact, and the BCV is directly connected to the second pillar, readiness. This is demonstrated within this deliverable, together with practical examples serving as guidance, as shown in the illustration below. 

There are two guidelines presented in the deliverable; “Guidelines on sustainable value creation” and “Guidelines to create an energy positive city by 2050”. They are both a result of the four pillars of SVC, built around the logic that they represent, but the guideline for LHC Trondheims BCV has some additional prerequisites and future recommendations based on lessons learned. “Guidelines to create an energy positive city by 2050” is accompanied by a visualisation of the Trondheim BCV integrating activities, actions, and measures over the time span, and displaying relations between crucial steps and actions. The guidelines will be useful for other cities and regions when exploring or expanding their scope and possibilities on achieving the SDGs and becoming an energy positive city. 

For more details about Bold City Vision story and guideline to create an energy positive city by 2050, check out Deliverable 5.7 in the +CxC Knowledge Base . 

D5.7: +Trondheim 2050 Bold City Vision and Guidelines (Vision for Sustainable Urban Transition)

The deliverable D5.7: +Trondheim 2050 Bold City Vision and Guidelines (Vision for Sustainable Urban Transition) was submitted by TK with contributions from TK and NTNU in June 2022. The executive summary of the deliverable is available below and the full deliverable is at the end for download:

“The work in LHC Trondheim, in Trondheim Municipality and the municipality`s work with the UN Centre of Excellence on SDG City Transition, are overlapping, and for the purpose of the guidelines, it is recommended that it is seen as what the city has done through and together with initiatives sharing the same goal. The initiatives have reinforced one another and increased the positive synergies. That is why LHC Trondheim chose to share necessary information and preconditioning elements. Without showing the steps taken, the logic behind and how theory and practice coincides, this deliverable will fail at making complex matter understandable, adaptable and useful in further upscaling.

The Bold City Vision for LHC Trondheim is to become an energy positive city by 2050. In Norwegian the vision is called “Plussbyen Trondheim”. It is a vision, and not a document or a strategy. The prevailing deliverable and report answers to how we plan on reaching the vision, with description of methodology reasoning and paving the way to a guideline.

In order to create an energy positive city by 2050, there are many aspects that need to be taken into account. The LHC Trondheim vision is energy specific, however, strongly connected to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This elevates the work, gives it an unarguable timeliness, and energy is by all means a pervasive factor within the SDGs and their targets. Having that approach implies involving other sectors relevant for the multi-level, multi-disciplinary and multi-angle sustainable transformation. The guidelines to get there are applicable for other areas, and thereby more universal than if it was purely energy related.

The award winning innovation +CityxChange Bold City Vision Framework (Tanum et al., 2020) is the origin to all the derived frameworks and methodologies. The framework, including the methodology design, and the variety of uses is what culminates into guidelines. By linking it to the SDGs and a Norwegian context, it became a framework for Sustainable Societal Development. LHC Trondheim has used it to develop the municipal steering documents and perform SDG-budgeting. It is also valued as a SDG Transition Framework in the unpublished “Guidelines on the Sustainable Value Creation-led Voluntary Local Reviews in Norway and beyond” (Krause et al., 2021).

Trondheim Municipality received 3rd place as Icapital 2021, and that was much due to the systematics of the four pillars of Sustainable Value Creation (SVC). They demonstrate that taking stock of progress towards SDG is an opportunity to direct public and private partners towards mutually interesting and innovative opportunities for sustainable urban development. The four pillars of SVC; potential, readiness, opportunity, and impact are connected to the BCV framework by the second pillar, readiness. For all practical reasons it is the equivalent of the whole BCV framework. This is demonstrated within this deliverable, together with practical examples serving as guidance, and shown in the illustration below.

There are two guidelines presented in this deliverable; “Guidelines on sustainable value creation” and “Guidelines to create an energy positive city by 2050”. They are both a result of the four pillars of SVC, built around the logic that they represent, but the guideline for LHC Trondheims BCV has some additional prerequisites and future recommendations based on lessons learned. “Guidelines to create an energy positive city by 2050” is accompanied by a visualisation of the Trondheim BCV integrating activities, actions, and measures over the time span, and displaying relations between crucial steps and actions.

The guidelines will be useful for other cities and regions when exploring or expanding their scope and possibilities on archving the SDGs and becoming an energy positive city. However there are necessary levels of gouvernance that must be paid attention to. Especially striving for evidence based SDG-policy, political commitment, SDG-budgeting and multilateral partnerships for collaboration. Without this as an established basis, the city’s journey towards a greener, healthier, smarter and eventually climate neutrality may become cumbersome. The BCV framework has proven to be a valuable tool and methodology in the line of work in LHC Trondheim. Its continued enhancements have yielded results and knowledge vital to continue the progress of the city’s journey. The process is described in this deliverable, and contains many valuable aspects and methodologies in regards to implement the SDGs and create value on the journey towards becoming an energy positive city. 

The Sense and Non-Sense of PEDs—Feeding Back Practical Experiences of Positive Energy District Demonstrators into the European PED Framework Definition Development Process

Abstract

This article discusses early developments of the Positive Energy District (PED) concept, both in terms of its definition and of its implementation in real world demonstrators. Based on the specific challenges for creating an operational definition for the European +CityxChange project, the feasibility of creating a PED was practically explored by identifying 4 possible subtypes that respond to varying constraints regarding the energy balance of the PED. This article provides the context and describes these 4 ambitions levels: PEDautonomous, PEDdynamic, PEDvirtual, and PrePED; and the 3 boundary modes: geographical, functional, and virtual. The work thus expands on the first general PED definitions as they were put forward in the SET-plan and by the European Commission, while allowing a better response to the specific boundary conditions of PEDs’ physical context. As such, it provides an operational, city-focused, bottom-up PED definition. The present study analyses how these efforts connect to current work being performed on the development of a European PED Framework Definition. In the latter, new elements such as context factors are introduced in order to account for the varying boundary conditions that PEDs must address, and in particular the difficulties of realising PEDs in existing and densely built-up urban areas. Hereby it can be argued that the approach with 4 subtypes is a bottom-up method of addressing the same challenges as a context factor based approach operating in a top-down manner, this time starting from the regional or national renewable energy potentials. Both approaches indeed strive towards an optimum setup of PEDs both within their geographical boundaries and in their interactions with the surrounding energy infrastructures and cities. These efforts are instrumental in helping to prevent that a PED is being regarded as a goal in se, functionally disconnected from its surroundings. There are strong arguments in favour of handling PEDs as building blocks for the broader realisation of carbon neutral cities and regions, thus contributing to the systemic change that is needed to futureproof the built environment as a whole. Without applying this integrating perspective, PEDs risk creating a sub-optimal lock-in within their sites and thus remain one-off experiments, lacking connection to the wider urban sustainability strategies that are needed to properly address today’s energy and climate emergencies. This holds even more when considering the quality-related requirements that come with sustainable urban design and governance. Therefore, this study further explores how PEDs can fully support such a deep urban sustainability transition, and what could consequently be the next steps towards successful and upscaled PED deployment.


Year: 2022

Authors: Han Vandevyvere, Dirk Ahlers, and Annemie Wyckmans.

Publisher: Energies

D9.17: Report on Intra-Project Collaboration Including Study Visits and Peer-to-Peer Workshops 7

The deliverable D9.17: Report on Intra-Project Collaboration Including Study Visits and Peer-to-Peer Workshops 7 was submitted by NTNU with contributions from LCCC, TK, MP, SB, SMO, and VORU in June 2022. The executive summary of the deliverable is available below and the full deliverable is at the end for download:

“This report provides an overview of the study visits, peer-to-peer workshops, and other intra-project learning activities performed by the Lighthouse and Follower Cities and the other partners in +CityxChange, between 1 November 2021 and 30 April 2022 (M37-42).

These activities form part of Work Package 9 “Inter-Project Collaboration and Clustering”, Task 9.1 “Intra-Project Lighthouse and Follower City Cooperation”. They are designed to address the needs of the participating cities and solution providers in an effective manner, to better align goals and priorities, to promote cross-cultural communication, understanding and collaboration between the partners, and to speed up the learning process and iteration of results across the entire value chain.

This report (D9.17) is complemented by D9.18: Report on attendance at events held by other SCC-01 co-ordinators 7. Some general content is repeated from the previous D9.14: Report on Intra-Project Collaboration, including study visits and peer-to-peer workshops 6.

The Role of a Data Marketplace for Innovation and Value-Added Services in Smart and Sustainable Cities

Abstract

In this era of digitization, data is seen as the new oil due to the abundance of data generated from Internet of Things (IoT), social media and other platforms. Although prior studies have explored the challenges and opportunities that may arise in using these data to provide value added services, few studies explore how data from public, private and commercial data owners in smart cities and communities could enhance data reuse, sharing and collaboration among the different stakeholders. This study employs the system design approach to develop a data marketplace prototype, which provides data to create value-added services that could improve the lives of citizens. The prototype is developed for easy sharing, trading and utilization of available data for innovative services through collaboration. Qualitative data was collected using semi-structured interviews from experts in academia and industry to validate the concept of a data marketplace. Findings from this study reveal that the data marketplace prototype is useful, easy to use and supports data trading in smart cities.


Year: 2022

Authors: Rebekka Alvsvåg, Anthony Bokolo Jr. & Sobah Abbas Petersen

Publisher: I4CS – Innovations for Community Services

Digital Transformation of Virtual Enterprises for Providing Collaborative Services in Smart Cities

Abstract

Municipalities are digitally transforming urban environment into smarter cities aimed at addressing urban growth and social challenges. This transition of urban space influenced by Information and Communications Technology (ICT) enables novel business models and Virtual Enterprises (VE) processes. Presently, there is need to provide insights into the state-of-the-art of VE and development of digital transformation in order to improve services provided to citizens and stakeholders in smart cities. Therefore, the aim of this study is to employ ArchiMate as the modelling language to demonstrate the digitalization of VE to depict how VE collaborates in smart cities. Evidence from a focus group discussion was modelled in ArchiMate to present findings on how VE can be digitalized to provide collaborative services. Implications from this study provide insights to guide VE to understand the imperative need of digital changes in smart cities.


Year: 2020

Authors: Bokolo Anthony Jnr, Sobah Abbas Petersen, and Markus Helfert 

Publisher: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology

A Practice Based Exploration on Electric Mobility as a Service in Smart Cities

Abstract

With increase in urban residents and CO2 emission from vehicles, there is need to deploy smart electric mobility services termed as Electric Mobility as a Service (eMaaS) facilitated by innovations in Information Communication Technology (ICT) to mitigate environmental issues, improve social inclusion, and enhance economic growth. However, citizens and stakeholders are faced with issues related to acquiring appropriate information needed to make decisions which impacts their wellbeing and natural environment due to heterogenous data being generated from various sources. Therefore, this study adopts Enterprise Architecture (EA) and integrates Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to improve interoperability for acquisition, processing, retaining, and dissemination of mobility relevant data. Secondary data from the literature and ArchiMate modeling tool was utilized to model eMaaS case to verify the feasibility of EA to improve city transport services. Findings from ArchiMate reveal that EA provides a theoretical and practical approach that supports mobility services in smart cities.


Year: 2020

Authors: Bokolo Anthony Jnr & Sobah Abbas Petersen 

Publisher: Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing

Smart city data architecture for energy prosumption in municipalities: concepts, requirements, and future directions

Abstract

Big data is gaining visibility and importance, and its use is attaining higher levels of influence within municipalities. Due to this proliferation smart cities are posed to deploy architectures toward managing energy for Electric Vehicles (EV) and orchestrate the production, consumption, and distributing of energy from renewable sources such as solar, wind etc. in communities also known as prosumption. In smart city domain, Enterprise Architecture (EA) can be employed to facilitate alignment between municipality goals and the direction of the city in relation to Information Technology (IT) that supports stakeholders within the city. Hence, the alignment between IT and goals of the city is a critical process to support the continued growth and improvement of city services and energy sustainability. However, despite several research effort focused on data architecture in smart city, there have been few studies aimed at exploring how EA can be applied in smart cities to support residential buildings and EV for energy prosumption in municipalities. Therefore, this study conducts an extensive review and develops an architecture that can be employed in smart city domain based on big data management for energy prosumption in residential buildings and EV. Furthermore, secondary data was employed to present a case study to show the applications of the developed architecture in promoting energy prosumption. Findings suggest that the architecture provides interoperable open real-time, online, and historical data in facilitating energy prosumption. Respectively, this study offers exchange of data for sharing energy resources and provides insights to improve energy prosumption services.


Year: 2020

Authors: Bokolo Anthony Jnr

Publisher: International Journal of Green Energy

D4.10: Limerick Innovation Lab Solutions Catalogue 2

The deliverable D4.10: Limerick Innovation Lab Solutions Catalogue 2 was submitted by University of Limerick and SE with contributions from NTNU, LCCC, COL, MPOWER, and UL in June 2022. The executive summary of the deliverable is available below and the full deliverable is at the end for download:

“This catalogue is the second of two catalogues documenting Innovation Lab Solutions developed through implementation of the +CityxChange Innovation Playground in Limerick.

The objective of establishing an Innovation Playground in Limerick’s +CityxChange Demonstration Area is to enable collaborations between Limerick City and County Council, energy providers, businesses, academia and citizens to test and prototype innovative ideas to allow a movement towards the co-creation of DPEBs (Distributed Positive Energy Blocks) and PEDs (Positive Energy Districts).

A +CityxChange Innovation Playground is defined as a designated area in a city where activities and physical and virtual places related to innovation are assembled in a systematic way to facilitate collaboration, empower citizens, and find new ways to address challenges that matter to people (Mee & Crowe, 2020). An Innovation Playground comprises a System of ‘places’, ‘activities’, ‘data’ and ‘enabling mechanisms’ – four interrelated elements that generate the ingredients of a Localised Innovation Playground and enable Innovation Playground Journeys of observation, sensemaking, co-design and prototyping.

Implementation of the Innovation Playground in Limerick initially focussed on a series of Do-It-Together workshops and Open Innovation Calls integrated into the calendar of community participation events developed in Task 4.3 Community-led Open Innovation. In this second year, D3.6: Framework for DPEB Innovation Labs (Fitzgerald et. al, 2020) has been incorporated into Innovation Playground (IP) implementation with the objective to cultivate an open innovation ecosystem in Limerick. In addition to creating a physical space for digital innovation– the Citizen Innovation Lab – this framework introduced key open innovation concepts to Innovation Playground implementation. These include collaborative governance of the Innovation Playground; orchestration of the innovation ecosystem through an innovation agenda and a co-created programme of engagement; positive cycles of collaboration; serendipity and network effects.

Through embracing these concepts, linkages between the Innovation Playground and other +Limerick Demonstration Projects increased and the potential for the integrated operation of the six +CityxChange CommunityxChange frameworks to act as a platform for continuing collaboration was observed.

A Citizen Innovation Lab digital platform – https://citizeninnovationlab.ie/ – has been developed as a repository of Innovation Lab Solutions. This repository is also part of this Catalogue, and this document will refer to the platform regularly. The Solutions are presented as Stories of peoples’ interactions with the Citizen Innovation Lab and Innovation Playground to support replication and scaling up of the activities and solutions described. The Stories are also mapped against particular UN SDGs. The specific UN SDGs were identified and prioritised by the people of Limerick during the creation of a Bold City Vision, which in Limerick has been incorporated into the Limerick City and County Council Development Plan process.

D7.12: Reporting to the SCIS System 6

The deliverable D7.12: Reporting to the SCIS System 6 was submitted by FAC/KPMG FA with contributions from NTNU, LCCC, MPOWER, and 4C in June 2022. The executive summary of the deliverable is available below and the full deliverable is at the end for download:

“This report, Deliverable 7.12: Reporting to the SCIS (6), is part of a series of bi-annual reports and is the sixth iteration in the series; being the subsequent revision of the previous version, Deliverable 7.10: Reporting to the SCIS (5) submitted in Month 30 of the +CityxChange project.

During the reporting period WP7 has seen further engagement between all relevant KPI owners and KPMG FA; towards the refinement of KPI calculations, the resolution of data reporting issues, the pursuit of alignment in KPI data for the purposes of SRT reporting, and the further enhancement of MERT features and functionality – as feedback emerges through use.

As with prior periods, it has become necessary for KPI descriptions, scope and calculations to be reviewed and adjusted as and where necessary – due to changing circumstances in data availability and adapting to challenges encountered in conforming this data to reporting standards on an ongoing basis. This process has been facilitated within WP7, and is ongoing so that all KPIs can be captured and reported to the MERT and/or the SRT as compatible.

The MERT has undergone a number of updates and refinements to front- and back-end processes during the period in an effort to deliver a more efficient and functional dashboard and tool. Work on the MERT has included the adjustment of layout and design to improve the user interface experience, and the further testing of APIs to enable automated data sharing to the MERT.

As of writing of this deliverable, data for 14 KPIs had been submitted to the MERT, with a total of 19 KPIs having monitoring data reported. Proposals on potentially compatible ways to bridge the gap between KPI data headers / data points and SCM SRT have been developed with multiple SRT configuration options proposed to find a suitable and representative data capturing configuration that will be operable.

Within the reporting period, three KPIs were classified as potentially incompatible given their data issues and two KPIs were deemed theoretically compatible should data come on stream. Other KPIs are still subject to review. This collaborative process continues with KPI owners, however, WP7 may consider assessing the overall viability of aligning with SRT reporting in the next reporting period.